FAQ

  1. What if I mix several chemicals together. Can I use the individual material to chemical ratings that are listed in the chemical resistance chart to transfer this fluid mixtures?
  2. How often should I tighten fasteners on my plastic pumps?
  3. Do I have to ground the pump when pumping flammable fluids?
  4. How does high specific gravity affect my pumping application?
  5. Do all pumps have dual manifold capability?
  6. How do I pump high viscosity fluids?
  7. The pump was working just fine, but it has slowed down and I’m not getting the needed capacity. What can I do?
  8. Is there some way that I can extend the life of my diaphragms, balls and valve seats?
  9. Can I submerge the pump?
  10. How should I regulate the flow of a diaphragm pump?
  11. Can I operate the pumps at pressures higher than the maximum pressure ratings?
  12. My polypropylene pump is installed outside and has started cracking. What is the problem?
  13. I hear a lot about Geolast®. What type of resistance does Geolast® have?
  14. Do I need an air line lubricator for these pumps?
  15. Is there anything special that I should tell the customer when pumping hazardous fluids?
  16. Is there a model recommended for use in food applications?
  17. What if the concentration of acid is given with a degree symbol, such as, 66°, does this mean that it is 66%?
  18. Can I use polypropylene with hydrofluoric acid?
  19. What if the chemical to material has a ‘B’ rating in the chemical resistance chart?
  20. When I cannot find a certain chemical on the resistance chart, what do I do?
  21. If the fluid temperature exceeds 150°F what pump should be used?
  22. Can I pump inks with this type of pump? (Similar questions are asked concerning paints and adhesives and can be answered in a similar manner).

What if I mix several chemicals together. Can I use the individual material to chemical ratings that are listed in the chemical resistance chart to transfer this fluid mixtures?

Proceed with caution. Individual ratings may or may not be appropriate for a chemical cocktail. Again, is the fluid currently being transferred successfully using a particular set of materials?

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How often should I tighten fasteners on my plastic pumps?

That depends on the application. Pressure, average hours in service, and temperature all affect the flow of plastic. Pumps need tightening if leakage should occur. Tightening should be part of any preventive maintenance program and should be based on the service duty of the pump.

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Do I have to ground the pump when pumping flammable fluids?

Yes. This can be done with conductive plastic pumps via the grounding lugs. If you are not using a conductive plastic pump then ground the fluid through a metallic pipe nipple at both the suction and discharge ports. Metal pumps should also be grounded.

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How does high specific gravity affect my pumping application?

If the pump is flooded, fluids with high specific gravity may exceed the pump suction limitations of 10psi. If the pump is above the level of the fluid, high specific gravity will limit suction lift.

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Do all pumps have dual manifold capability?

All 1/4”, 3/8” and 1/2” pumps can be configured at the factory for dual manifolds.

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How do I pump high viscosity fluids?

If it pours, you can pump it.
A. Use large suction lines, up to three times the size of the pump ports.
B. Position the pump as close to (or below) the level of the fluid as possible.
C. Start the fluid slowly using an air line valve. Set the air pressure and crack the valve open slowly.

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The pump was working just fine, but it has slowed down and I’m not getting the needed capacity. What can I do?

Check fluid suction lines for obstructions and also check the valve seats for debris. Make sure that the fluid has not gotten more viscous with a decrease in the temperature.

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Is there some way that I can extend the life of my diaphragms, balls and valve seats?

Remove sharp particles from the fluid. If the fluid is abrasive, slow the pumping speed or go to a larger pump. Do not over pressurize. In general, the slower the pump operates the longer life you will have with all moving components.

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Can I submerge the pump?

Yes, if the fluid is compatible with the pump housing and fasteners and if you pipe the exhaust above the level of the fluid.

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How should I regulate the flow of a diaphragm pump?

You can regulate the flow of a diaphragm pump three ways. Reduce or increase the air pressure, making sure that you are within the operating limits of the pump. You can increase or decrease the amount of air volume going to the pump via a valve on the air line and finally, a valve on the fluid discharge may be opened or closed. NEVER restrict fluid suction lines!

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Can I operate the pumps at pressures higher than the maximum pressure ratings?

No. The pumps will start leaking, diaphragms may bulge and inner plates may bend.

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My polypropylene pump is installed outside and has started cracking. What is the problem?

Polypropylene is not resistant to UV rays. Also, polypropylene is limited to use in temperatures over 32°F. For this type of application it is best to use a PVDF model, a metal model or shroud and insulate your polypropylene model.

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I hear a lot about Geolast®. What type of resistance does Geolast® have?

It is similar to that of Buna-N (Nitrile).

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Do I need an air line lubricator for these pumps?

No, never use air line lubrication.

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Is there anything special that I should tell the customer when pumping hazardous fluids?

Yes. If a diaphragm should rupture, the exhaust should always be piped to a control area — a place for safe handling or back to the tank — since fluid will enter the air system if the diaphragm is breached. Also, never forget to wear protection for eyes, lungs and skin when near hazardous fluids.

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Is there a model recommended for use in food applications?

Our All-PũR® model has electropolished and passivated 316SS and FDA approved elastomers for use in food and sanitary applications.

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What if the concentration of acid is given with a degree symbol, such as, 66°, does this mean that it is 66%?

The degree symbol means degrees baume. In this case the 66° is actually 98% in strength. You will find this symbol often used when describing sulfuric acid.

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Can I use polypropylene with hydrofluoric acid?

Since all pumps use natural polypropylene you can pump hydrofluoric acid after consulting a chemical guide for concentration and temperature limits.

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What if the chemical to material has a ‘B’ rating in the chemical resistance chart?

We do not recommend that anything other than ‘A’ rated combinations be used. If you select a chemical to material rating of ‘B’ the warranty is void.

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When I cannot find a certain chemical on the resistance chart, what do I do?

A. Ask what materials are presently being used to transfer the fluid or if there is a manufacturer’s recommendation that is on the fluid container, etc.
B. If there is no other information on this chemical, you will have to check with the manufacturer of the fluid and find out what is recommended.
C. Never guess on the chemical compatibility of a particular material.

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If the fluid temperature exceeds 150°F what pump should be used?

Pumps that are rated up to 200°F are the PVDF models and all of the metal pumps. Check your chemical compatibility chart for compatibility.

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Can I pump inks with this type of pump? (Similar questions are asked concerning paints and adhesives and can be answered in a similar manner).

Yes, but prior to making a pump selection you need to know if the fluid is a solvent or water-based product. What is the viscosity and temperature of the product? Generally if the fluid is solvent based, a good choice is nylon or aluminum models with PTFE elastomers. When pumping chlorinated solvents, 316 SS models are the best choice.

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